September 12th, 2013
Cascade Peak, Glacier National Park 
(by Jared Ropelato)

Cascade Peak, Glacier National Park 

(by Jared Ropelato)

(via cornersoftheworld)

August 25th, 2013
collectivehistory:
Damage to St Paul’s cathedral during the blitz, 1940 (Source) 

collectivehistory:

Damage to St Paul’s cathedral during the blitz, 1940 (Source

(via collectivehistory-deactivated20)

breakingnews:
New works from J.D. Salinger to be published in 2015
J.D. Salinger’s estate will publish at least five additional books, beginning in 2015, according to a forthcoming documentary and related book, both titled “Salinger.”The New York Times reports the new books and stories were largely written before Mr. Salinger assigned his output to a trust in 2008, and would greatly expand the Salinger legacy.Photo: San Diego Historical Society / Getty Images

breakingnews:

New works from J.D. Salinger to be published in 2015

J.D. Salinger’s estate will publish at least five additional books, beginning in 2015, according to a forthcoming documentary and related book, both titled “Salinger.”

The New York Times reports the new books and stories were largely written before Mr. Salinger assigned his output to a trust in 2008, and would greatly expand the Salinger legacy.

Photo: San Diego Historical Society / Getty Images

August 23rd, 2013

collectivehistory:

Salvador Dali & Walt Disney, Destino, 2003

Destino was storyboarded by Disney studio artist John Hench and artist Salvador Dalí for eight months in late 1945 and 1946; however production ceased not long after. The Walt Disney Company, then Walt Disney Studios, was plagued by many financial woes in the World War II era. Hench compiled a short animation test of about 17 seconds in the hopes of rekindling Disney’s interest in the project, but the production was no longer deemed financially viable and put on indefinite hiatus.

In 1999, Walt Disney’s nephew Roy E. Disney, while working on Fantasia 2000, unearthed the dormant project and decided to bring it back to life. Disney Studios France, the company’s small Parisian production department, was brought on board to complete the project. The short was produced by Baker Bloodworth and directed by French animator Dominique Monfréy in his first directorial role. A team of approximately 25 animators deciphered Dalí and Hench’s cryptic storyboards, and finished Destino’s production. 

Sources: 1, 2

(via collectivehistory-deactivated20)

August 22nd, 2013

odditiesoflife:

Amazing Bird That Mimics Man-Made Sounds

Aside from his incredible white-webbed tail, you might not think there is anything special about this bird. Well, there is. This bird can imitate sounds in an amazing way. Just take a minute and watch what this bird can do…I think you will be quite astounded.

The Lyrebird is famous for its ability to mimic sounds. Not only can the bird mimic over 20 different bird species, it can reproduce the sounds of a car alarm, a chainsaw and a camera shutter.

(Source: britannica.com, via thescienceofreality)

Antoinette Tuff: Meet the Woman Who Prevented a Mass School Shooting Yesterday
Fortunately, Tuesday’s gunman incident at an elementary school near Atlanta ended with no injuries or deaths. This is mainly thanks to Antoinette Tuff, a school clerk who spent about an hour calmly persuading the gunman to put his rifle down and surrender.
Tuff feared the worst when she encountered the gunman carrying an AK-47 assault rifle and other weapons in her school office. She told reporters, “I saw a young man ready to kill anybody that he could.” Approximately 870 pre-kindergarten to fifth grade students at the Ronald E. McNair Discovery Learning Academy in Decatur, Georgia were safely evacuated during the incident. While the gunman exchanged some shots with the police, no one was hurt.
Tuff told Atlanta’s local news station that the 20-year-old gunman was able to pass the school’s security because he followed a parent who had not shut the door. She immediately began speaking with the gunman in an attempt to reason with him. The gunman told her he had nothing to live for before loading his gun. “I just started talking to him … I let him know what was going on with me and that it would be OK,” she said. “I give it all to God, I’m not the hero. I was terrified.”
She told ABC’s Diane Sawyer that much of her conversation focused not only on trying to understand the gunman, but also on trying to get the gunman to relate to her. “I just started telling him stories,” she said, and things like, “You don’t have to die today.” Tuff told him a story of tragedy in her own life, and explained to reporters that she simply asked him to put his weapons down and surrender to police. She “talked him through it” by reminding him that “life will still bring about turns, but we can learn from it.”
source

Antoinette Tuff: Meet the Woman Who Prevented a Mass School Shooting Yesterday

Fortunately, Tuesday’s gunman incident at an elementary school near Atlanta ended with no injuries or deaths. This is mainly thanks to Antoinette Tuff, a school clerk who spent about an hour calmly persuading the gunman to put his rifle down and surrender.

Tuff feared the worst when she encountered the gunman carrying an AK-47 assault rifle and other weapons in her school office. She told reporters, “I saw a young man ready to kill anybody that he could.” Approximately 870 pre-kindergarten to fifth grade students at the Ronald E. McNair Discovery Learning Academy in Decatur, Georgia were safely evacuated during the incident. While the gunman exchanged some shots with the police, no one was hurt.

Tuff told Atlanta’s local news station that the 20-year-old gunman was able to pass the school’s security because he followed a parent who had not shut the door. She immediately began speaking with the gunman in an attempt to reason with him. The gunman told her he had nothing to live for before loading his gun. “I just started talking to him … I let him know what was going on with me and that it would be OK,” she said. “I give it all to God, I’m not the hero. I was terrified.”

She told ABC’s Diane Sawyer that much of her conversation focused not only on trying to understand the gunman, but also on trying to get the gunman to relate to her. “I just started telling him stories,” she said, and things like, “You don’t have to die today.” Tuff told him a story of tragedy in her own life, and explained to reporters that she simply asked him to put his weapons down and surrender to police. She “talked him through it” by reminding him that “life will still bring about turns, but we can learn from it.”

source

(Source: yamino, via reagan-was-a-horrible-president)

August 21st, 2013
theatlantic:
Why Women Prefer Working Together (and Why Men Prefer Working Alone)
One of the puzzles of the persistent gender wage gap is why women are highly overrepresented in certain fields, like the nonprofit sector, and hugely underrepresented in other fields, like financial institutions and executive positions in major companies. One reasonable question to ask about the gap is: How much should we blame “the system” (i.e.: clubby nepotism, sexism, lack of paternity leave) and how much should we chalk this up to women’s decisions (i.e.: leaning out in their late 20s and choosing careers that pay less even when they had options to earn more).
Peter J. Kuhn and Marie-Claire Villeval wade into this contentious field with a new study: "Are Women More Attracted to Cooperation Than Men?" The short answer is, well, yes. The more complex answer is: Yes, because men demonstrate more overconfidence in their own abilities and distrust in their colleagues’ aptitude, except under key situations.
Read more. [Image: AnnieAnniePancake/Flickr]

theatlantic:

Why Women Prefer Working Together (and Why Men Prefer Working Alone)

One of the puzzles of the persistent gender wage gap is why women are highly overrepresented in certain fields, like the nonprofit sector, and hugely underrepresented in other fields, like financial institutions and executive positions in major companies. One reasonable question to ask about the gap is: How much should we blame “the system” (i.e.: clubby nepotism, sexism, lack of paternity leave) and how much should we chalk this up to women’s decisions (i.e.: leaning out in their late 20s and choosing careers that pay less even when they had options to earn more).

Peter J. Kuhn and Marie-Claire Villeval wade into this contentious field with a new study: "Are Women More Attracted to Cooperation Than Men?" The short answer is, well, yes. The more complex answer is: Yes, because men demonstrate more overconfidence in their own abilities and distrust in their colleagues’ aptitude, except under key situations.

Read more. [Image: AnnieAnniePancake/Flickr]

shortformblog:
Manning sentenced to 35 years in prison: He’s also receiving a dishonorable discharge, a loss of rank, and a forfeit of his pay. However, he will not be fined.
Updates when we get them.
UPDATE: Manning will be eligible for parole, but will be required to serve one-third of the sentence. With time served—1,293 days—counted against the 35-year total, that means he’ll be in prison for a minimum of eight more years. The sentence is a little more than half what the federal government asked for.

shortformblog:

Manning sentenced to 35 years in prison: He’s also receiving a dishonorable discharge, a loss of rank, and a forfeit of his pay. However, he will not be fined.

Updates when we get them.

UPDATE: Manning will be eligible for parole, but will be required to serve one-third of the sentence. With time served—1,293 days—counted against the 35-year total, that means he’ll be in prison for a minimum of eight more years. The sentence is a little more than half what the federal government asked for.

August 20th, 2013
whisperingcraneinstitute:
You can thank the Apis mellifera, better known as the Western honeybee, for 1 in every 3 mouthfuls you’ll eat today. Honeybees — which pollinate crops like apples, blueberries and cucumbers — are the “glue that holds our agricultural system together,” as the journalist Hannah Nordhaus put it in her 2011 book The Beekeeper’s Lament. But that glue is failing. Bee hives are dying off or disappearing thanks to a still-unsolved malady called colony collapse disorder (CCD), so much so that commercial beekeepers are being pushed out of the business. So what’s killing the honeybees? Pesticides — including a new class called neonicotinoids — seem to be harming bees even at what should be safe levels. Biological threats like the Varroa mite are killing off colonies directly and spreading deadly diseases. As our farms become monocultures of commodity crops like wheat and corn — plants that provide little pollen for foraging bees — honeybees are literally starving to death. If we don’t do something, there may not be enough honeybees to meet the pollination demands for valuable crops. But more than that, in a world where up to 100,000 species go extinct each year, the vanishing honeybee could be the herald of a permanently diminished planet.
(via The Plight of the Honeybee - TIME)

whisperingcraneinstitute:

You can thank the Apis mellifera, better known as the Western honeybee, for 1 in every 3 mouthfuls you’ll eat today. Honeybees — which pollinate crops like apples, blueberries and cucumbers — are the “glue that holds our agricultural system together,” as the journalist Hannah Nordhaus put it in her 2011 book The Beekeeper’s Lament. But that glue is failing. Bee hives are dying off or disappearing thanks to a still-unsolved malady called colony collapse disorder (CCD), so much so that commercial beekeepers are being pushed out of the business. So what’s killing the honeybees? Pesticides — including a new class called neonicotinoids — seem to be harming bees even at what should be safe levels. Biological threats like the Varroa mite are killing off colonies directly and spreading deadly diseases. As our farms become monocultures of commodity crops like wheat and corn — plants that provide little pollen for foraging bees — honeybees are literally starving to death. If we don’t do something, there may not be enough honeybees to meet the pollination demands for valuable crops. But more than that, in a world where up to 100,000 species go extinct each year, the vanishing honeybee could be the herald of a permanently diminished planet.

(via The Plight of the Honeybee - TIME)

(via bittersweetart)